BAROMETER

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03485

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£129.00
The Dalvey barometer is precision-engineered, handsome, accurate, reliable and portable.   A German aneroid barometer is housed in mirror-polished sta... Read More
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03485

In stock

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  • Description

    The Dalvey barometer is precision-engineered, handsome, accurate, reliable and portable.

     

    A German aneroid barometer is housed in mirror-polished stainless steel casing. The stunning face combines a rich, oily blue, sunray-brushed dial with raised increments and meteorological details.

     

    Perfectly suited to personalisation, the barometer can be engraved with initials, dates, a name, or a memorable phrase - making it an ideal gift for a special occasion, and the perfect design-led feature to ornament a desk, mantelpiece, bookshelf or counter-top.

     

    Movement: 4" German aneroid.

     

    Size: Diameter: 78mm Height: 76mm

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  • Engraving

    This product can be personalised with unique engraving. Select from the drop-down menu below and complete the text entry field for messages or initials; more complex designs can be quoted for – to make an enquiry about these, please write to us at mailorder@dalvey.com

  • Gifting

    The Dalvey range is ideally suited for gifting occasions, and this product is no exception.  For gift wrapping options, please proceed to the checkout page.

    more about our Exceptional Gifts >>

The ideal gift for a special occasion

Dalvey barometers are precision-engineered, beautiful, reliable and portable. A German aneroid barometer is housed in mirror-polished stainless steel casing; each stunning face combines striking dials with raised increments and meteorological details. Perfectly suited to personalisation, the barometer can be engraved with initials, dates, a name, or a memorable phrase - making it an ideal gift for a special occasion, and the perfect design-led feature to ornament a desk, mantelpiece, bookshelf or counter-top.

A point of difference...

The original Dalvey Barometer was developed shortly after the launch of our iconic Voyager Clock – and shares the same clam-shell-like case design and striking presence when open and displayed. Our latest editions feature luxury-watch-standard dials in a range of differentiated characters: from deep, rich blue, through exuberant turquoise, to elegant grey with rose gold accents – perfect for adding a point of colour and elegant design to a kitchen, study, reception, or hall.


Horror vacui

The barometer is widely credited as the invention of Evangelista Torricelli, who built the first working version of a mercury barometer in 1643. In fact, Descartes is credited with having conceived of the barometer some years previously but is not thought to have built such an instrument.

There would be no barometer without the recognition that a vacuum is possible in nature – contra Aristotle’s assertion of the horror vacui, or nature’s abhorrence. In the Seventeenth Century it was assumed – even by Galileo – that air had no weight. The proof that this was not in fact the case emerged from a very practical exigency: Tuscan miners were struggling to pump water over a vertical distance of 12m, using suction pumps, but found that they could only raise the water by 10.3m…



Evangelista Torricelli
1608 – 1647

Torricelli’s experimental paradigm involved placing a long glass tube containing a column of water into a shallow pool (Fig. i). When the stopper at the bottom of the tube was removed, Torricelli found that the column of water descended (creating a sealed vacuum at the other end of the tube), but only so far as to allow its height to equal the threshold of 10.3m over which the miners had struggled to pump their water.


(Fig. i)
Torricelli’s demonstration 1643

Torricelli realised that it was the downward pressure of many kilometres of air above the water in the open pool that was preventing the column of water in the tube from fully descending into the pool, and recognised that this first barometer was actually a kind of balance: equalising the respective pressures of the air above the open pool, and the column of water in the tube. This realisation prompted Torricelli to build a much smaller, more practical version - using mercury. Since mercury is around 13 times denser than water, it’s effectively able to fall farther than water would, and so the height of the column of mercury fell to about 76cm – much less than the 10.3m height of the water. This greater density meant that mercury barometers could provide useful readings even when much smaller than those using water.

The barometric altimeter

The French mathematician, Blaise Pascal, realised that if air had weight, then presumably air pressure would be lower at higher altitudes – the less air there is above your head, the less of it there is weighing down upon you. In 1648 he asked his brother-in-law to carry a mercury barometer up a mountain, recording the height of the mercury as he rose. As predicted, the air pressure was lower the further up he went. As such, when properly calibrated a barometer may also function as an altimeter.

Twelve years later, in 1660, the German scientist, Otto von Guericke, observed from a barometer that air pressure had been falling. He correctly predicted a storm would come, and hence initiated the meteorological use of barometers.

The aneroid barometer

The first barometer to function without liquid was invented in 1844 by the French scientist, Lucien Vidi. The “aneroid” barometer relies on an “aneroid cell”: a small metal chamber containing a partial vacuum. The cell is prevented from collapsing in upon itself by a strong spring; this allows changes in air pressure to manifest as slight changes in the volume of the cell (the less pressure, the more the spring is able expand the walls of the cell; the more pressure, the more the atmospheric air is able to push in upon the walls of the cell, contracting its volume).



Illustration of Vidi’s aneroid barometer
‘Le Monde Physique’
by Amedee Guillemin 1881




The slight changes are amplified by a system of levers and springs, which alter the tension on the ‘fusee chain’. This tension is translated into radial movement via the ‘hairspring’ and pointer so as to be easily read upon the face.

Dalvey barometers contain a reliable German-made aneroid cell (or “bellows”) and mechanism: no liquid is involved.

The Age of Discovery

Notable among the innovators who developed barometric technology was the English naval officer, scientist, one-time Governor of New Zealand, and Member of the Royal Society, Robert FitzRoy. In addition to captaining the HMS Beagle, during which he enjoyed the company of Charles Darwin, FitzRoy developed a number of new barometer styles, and is thought to have coined the phrase, “weather forecast”. He was appointed as chief of a new government department, which would evolve into today’s Meteorological Office. Since 2002, when one of the regions of sea surrounding the British Isles was renamed from “Finisterre” to “Fitzroy”, he has effectively been commemorated twice daily by the BBC, during its famous shipping forecasts.



Vice-Admiral Robert FitzRoy
1805 – 1865

Using a barometer...

It’s important to remember that the meteorological value of a barometer comes from its measurement of changes in air pressure, as opposed to the absolute measurement values (which have greater altimetric value). The ‘reference pointer’ should be pre-set to match the initial pressure reading, after which observations of rising pressure denote improving weather, and falling, the contrary.

Gifting: perfectly calibrated

Each Dalvey Barometer comes in beautiful presentation packaging, and can be personalised with engraved initials, a name, a date, or a memorable phrase. This, together with its connotations of preparedness irrespective of conditions, makes the Barometer an ideal gift to mark a moment of significance or a special juncture in life, such as a wedding, graduation, retirement, or an especially important birthday.


Over the years we’ve had the privilege and pleasure of engraving hundreds of messages on barometers; some of our favourites have been quotes from some of the explorers and adventurers who would have so vitally depended upon their barometric and navigational instruments:


Optimism is true moral courage

Shackleton


You learn to know a pilot in a storm

Seneca


It is the work that matters, not the applause that follows

Scott


Every cloud engenders not a storm

Shakespeare

Why Dalvey?

  • Family run from the Highlands of Scotland since 1897
  • Iconic designs - memorable gifts
  • Free Standard & Express Tracked delivery
    when order values exceed local delivery thresholds

The ideal gift for a special occasion

Dalvey barometers are precision-engineered, beautiful, reliable and portable. A German aneroid barometer is housed in mirror-polished stainless steel casing; each stunning face combines striking dials with raised increments and meteorological details. Perfectly suited to personalisation, the barometer can be engraved with initials, dates, a name, or a memorable phrase - making it an ideal gift for a special occasion, and the perfect design-led feature to ornament a desk, mantelpiece, bookshelf or counter-top.

A point of difference...

The original Dalvey Barometer was developed shortly after the launch of our iconic Voyager Clock – and shares the same clam-shell-like case design and striking presence when open and displayed. Our latest editions feature luxury-watch-standard dials in a range of differentiated characters: from deep, rich blue, through exuberant turquoise, to elegant grey with rose gold accents – perfect for adding a point of colour and elegant design to a kitchen, study, reception, or hall.

Horror vacui

The barometer is widely credited as the invention of Evangelista Torricelli, who built the first working version of a mercury barometer in 1643. In fact, Descartes is credited with having conceived of the barometer some years previously but is not thought to have built such an instrument.

There would be no barometer without the recognition that a vacuum is possible in nature – contra Aristotle’s assertion of the horror vacui, or nature’s abhorrence. In the Seventeenth Century it was assumed – even by Galileo – that air had no weight. The proof that this was not in fact the case emerged from a very practical exigency: Tuscan miners were struggling to pump water over a vertical distance of 12m, using suction pumps, but found that they could only raise the water by 10.3m…

 


Evangelista Torricelli
1608 – 1647

 

Torricelli’s experimental paradigm involved placing a long glass tube containing a column of water into a shallow pool (Fig. i). When the stopper at the bottom of the tube was removed, Torricelli found that the column of water descended (creating a sealed vacuum at the other end of the tube), but only so far as to allow its height to equal the threshold of 10.3m over which the miners had struggled to pump their water.


(Fig. i)
Torricelli’s demonstration 1643

 

Torricelli realised that it was the downward pressure of many kilometres of air above the water in the open pool that was preventing the column of water in the tube from fully descending into the pool, and recognised that this first barometer was actually a kind of balance: equalising the respective pressures of the air above the open pool, and the column of water in the tube. This realisation prompted Torricelli to build a much smaller, more practical version - using mercury. Since mercury is around 13 times denser than water, it’s effectively able to fall farther than water would, and so the height of the column of mercury fell to about 76cm – much less than the 10.3m height of the water. This greater density meant that mercury barometers could provide useful readings even when much smaller than those using water.

The barometric altimeter

The French mathematician, Blaise Pascal, realised that if air had weight, then presumably air pressure would be lower at higher altitudes – the less air there is above your head, the less of it there is weighing down upon you. In 1648 he asked his brother-in-law to carry a mercury barometer up a mountain, recording the height of the mercury as he rose. As predicted, the air pressure was lower the further up he went. As such, when properly calibrated a barometer may also function as an altimeter.

Twelve years later, in 1660, the German scientist, Otto von Guericke, observed from a barometer that air pressure had been falling. He correctly predicted a storm would come, and hence initiated the meteorological use of barometers.

The aneroid barometer

The first barometer to function without liquid was invented in 1844 by the French scientist, Lucien Vidi. The “aneroid” barometer relies on an “aneroid cell”: a small metal chamber containing a partial vacuum. The cell is prevented from collapsing in upon itself by a strong spring; this allows changes in air pressure to manifest as slight changes in the volume of the cell (the less pressure, the more the spring is able expand the walls of the cell; the more pressure, the more the atmospheric air is able to push in upon the walls of the cell, contracting its volume).

 


Illustration of Vidi’s aneroid barometer
‘Le Monde Physique’
by Amedee Guillemin 1881

 

The slight changes are amplified by a system of levers and springs, which alter the tension on the ‘fusee chain’. This tension is translated into radial movement via the ‘hairspring’ and pointer so as to be easily read upon the face.

 

 

 

Dalvey barometers contain a reliable German-made aneroid cell (or “bellows”) and mechanism: no liquid is involved.

The Age of Discovery

Notable among the innovators who developed barometric technology was the English naval officer, scientist, one-time Governor of New Zealand, and Member of the Royal Society, Robert FitzRoy.

 


Vice-Admiral Robert FitzRoy
1805 – 1865

 

In addition to captaining the HMS Beagle, during which he enjoyed the company of Charles Darwin, FitzRoy developed a number of new barometer styles, and is thought to have coined the phrase, “weather forecast”. He was appointed as chief of a new government department, which would evolve into today’s Meteorological Office. Since 2002, when one of the regions of sea surrounding the British Isles was renamed from “Finisterre” to “Fitzroy”, he has effectively been commemorated twice daily by the BBC, during its famous shipping forecasts.

Using a barometer...

It’s important to remember that the meteorological value of a barometer comes from its measurement of changes in air pressure, as opposed to the absolute measurement values (which have greater altimetric value). The ‘reference pointer’ should be pre-set to match the initial pressure reading, after which observations of rising pressure denote improving weather, and falling, the contrary.

Gifting: perfectly calibrated

Each Dalvey Barometer comes in beautiful presentation packaging, and can be personalised with engraved initials, a name, a date, or a memorable phrase. This, together with its connotations of preparedness irrespective of conditions, makes the Barometer an ideal gift to mark a moment of significance or a special juncture in life, such as a wedding, graduation, retirement, or an especially important birthday.

 


Over the years we’ve had the privilege and pleasure of engraving hundreds of messages on barometers; some of our favourites have been quotes from some of the explorers and adventurers who would have so vitally depended upon their barometric and navigational instruments:



Optimism is true moral courage

Shackleton


You learn to know a pilot in a storm

Seneca


It is the work that matters, not the applause that follows

Scott


Every cloud engenders not a storm

Shakespeare

 

Why Dalvey?

  • Family run from the Highlands of Scotland
  • Iconic designs - memorable gifts
  • Free Standard & Express Tracked delivery
    when order values exceed local delivery thresholds
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Testimonials
We are more than pleased with the barometer - it is all we hoped for. This item fits the bill exactly and may be, sometime in the future, we will match it up with a clock in a case. I am sure our son will treasure it and keep it within his family for many years to come. Thanks to Doreen for checking it over and your engraver for such a good job And a special thanks to you for your excellent customer service
Russell, Dec 2015
Barometer

The Dalvey barometer features precision German components, and a mirror-polished stainless steel case. Aneroid barometers employ a sprung vacuum cell, slight changes in the compression of which are amplified by levers to represent fluctuations in air pressure, which can be used to forecast local weather. As a portable instrument, the Dalvey barometer can also function as an altimeter.

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